Promoting and protecting the health and safety of all Idahoans
Español    Idaho.gov    About Us    Contact Us  

View Article

26
posted on October 26, 2012 14:01

NEWS RELEASE--FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                         Date: Oct. 26, 2012 
Contact:
 Niki Forbing-Orr
Public Information Officer 
(208) 334-0693

Have a glowingly safe Halloween

Little ghouls will be hitting the sidewalks after dark to collect their treats on Oct. 31, many of them carrying flashlights and glow sticks. 

One of the most common calls to Idaho’s Poison Center at this time of year is about those glow sticks, which are plastic tubes filled with liquid that glows. They are soft and can break open easily. If children get the liquid into their mouths or eyes, it will sting. But there’s no need to run to the emergency room. Call the poison center at 1-800-222-1222 and the specialist will tell you what you need to do.  

Other tips to keep you and your children safe, from the Idaho Poison Center: 
  • Consider non-edible treats such as stickers, pencils, erasers, or other party favors for children who don’t want candy or who may have allergies.
  • Treats should be carefully checked by adults before they’re eaten. Homemade treats or anything out of an original wrapper should be thrown away unless parents know the person who gave out the treat.
  • Costumes should be warm, fit well and be flame resistant.  
  • Masks should provide adequate vision and should be removed while children are crossing streets. Consider using inexpensive, nontoxic face paint instead of masks. 
  • If you’re going to be out after dark, consider using reflective tape on costumes or treat bags as well as carrying flashlights or glow sticks.
  • Frostbite can occur if dry ice touches the skin or mouth. Serving punch containing dry ice is not dangerous as long as the ice is not swallowed in its solid form. Small pieces should not be put in individual glasses. 
For more information, contact the Poison Center by calling 1-800-222-1222. The Poison Center is sponsored by the Nebraska Medical Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.