About Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorders (SUD) involve the recurrent use of alcohol and/or drugs causing clinically significant impairment including health problems, legal issues, disability, and failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school, or home. This disorder is common, recurrent and often serious, but SUD is treatable, and many people do recover with the right treatment and support. 

About Substance Use Disorder

The Division of Behavioral Health’s (DBH) Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Services Program provides statewide treatment and recovery support services for qualifying individuals and families struggling with the disease of addiction.  We support a client-centered approach to treatment and require that our service providers all use Evidence Based Practices when treating for addiction.  We offer an array of services including out-patient and residential treatment, as well as recovery support services such as safe and sober housing and transportation. Eligible clients will be assessed to determine what level of care and what array of supports they need to start a life of recovery.   

Individuals looking for help can call 800-922-3406, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. MST for a confidential screening to determine eligibility for our services.

Opioid information

An opioid is a strong medication used to treat moderate to severe short-term or chronic pain. Heroin and illicitly-manufactured fentanyl are examples of non-prescription opioids. Opioid Use Disorder or dependence can develop with prolonged use of opioids. DBH offers Medication Assisted Treatment, psycho-social therapy and recovery support services for individuals seeking recovery.  

If you are looking for help to quit using opioids, call 800-922-3406, Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. MST for a confidential screening to determine eligibility for our services.

Learn more about the risks of opioids and how to prevent an overdose. 

Behavioral Health newsletters

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Review quarterly Behavioral Health newsletters discussing topics related to mental health and substance use disorders spanning between 2013 and 2020.